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Pakistan strongly condemns terrorist attack in Vienna

Pakistan strongly condemns terrorist attack in Vienna
November 3, 2020

ISLAMABAD (92 News) - Pakistan has condemned in strongest terms the heinous terrorist attack in Central Vienna which resulted in the loss of precious lives and wounded several others.

In a statement, Foreign Office spokesperson Zahid Hafeez conveyed Pakistan's deepest condolences and heartfelt sympathies to the families of innocent victims and prayed for the speedy recovery of those injured.

The spokesperson said Pakistan condemns terrorism in all its forms and manifestations.

 

Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi has denounced the terrorist attack in Vienna.

In a statement, he expressed his grief and sorrow over the loss of lives in the despicable incident. Expressing solidarity with the government and people of Austria, he said Pakistan condemns terrorism.

Earlier, gunmen attacked six locations in central Vienna on Monday starting outside the main synagogue, killing two people and injuring at least 14 in what Austria called a “repulsive terror attack” while hunting one or more assailants on the loose.

Witnesses described the men firing into crowds in bars with automatic rifles, as many people took advantage of the last evening before a nationwide curfew was introduced because of COVID-19. Police shot and killed one assailant.

Police sealed off much of the historic centre of Vienna, urging the public to shelter in place. Many sought refuge in bars and hotels, while public transport throughout the old town was shut down and police scoured the city.

“It is the hardest day for Austria in many years. We are dealing with a terror attack the severity of which, thank God, we have not experienced in Austria in many years,” Interior Minister Karl Nehammer told a news conference.

Austria’s capital had so far been spared the kind of deadly militant attacks that have struck Paris, London, Berlin and Brussels, among others, in recent years. Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said the “repulsive” act was “definitely a terror attack”, but he could not say what the motive was.

Oskar Deutsch, the head of Vienna's Jewish community, which has offices adjoining the synagogue on a narrow cobbled street dotted with bars, said on Twitter that it was not clear whether the temple or offices were targeted but that they were closed at the time.

Rabbi Schlomo Hofmeister told London’s LBC radio he was living in the compound of the synagogue. “Upon hearing shots, we looked down (from) the windows and saw the gunmen shooting at the guests of the various bars and pubs,” he said.

“The gunmen were running around and shooting at least 100 rounds or even more in front of our building,” he said.

Border checks were being reinforced, the Interior Ministry said, and children would not be required to attend school on Tuesday. Although people were urged to stay indoors Vienna Mayor Michael Ludwig told broadcaster ORF the city would run normally on Tuesday, albeit with a tougher police presence.