Einstein letter fearing German anti-Semitism sells for $32,000

14 Nov, 2018 5:46 pm

JERUSALEM (Reuters) – A 1922 letter in which Albert Einstein confided his fears of the rise of anti-Semitism in Germany, more than a decade before the Nazis took power, sold at an Israeli auction on Tuesday for $32,000 (£24,680).

“Here are brewing economically and politically dark times, so I’m happy to be able to get away from everything,” wrote the 43-year-old physicist to his sister, Maria, after leaving Berlin for a location that goes unmentioned in the letter.

Einstein, who went on to win the Nobel Prize three months later, had departed the German capital after far-rightists assassinated Foreign Minister Walter Rathenu, a friend and fellow Jew, prompting police to warn him that he could be next.

“Nobody knows where I am, and I’m believed to be missing,” Einstein wrote. “I am doing quite well, in spite of all the anti-Semites among my German colleagues.”

The letter refers to a journey Einstein planned to Japan, suggesting that he penned it while waiting to sail out of the northern port of Kiel.


When the Nazis took over Germany in 1933, launching a campaign of anti-Jewish persecution that would culminate in the Holocaust, Einstein was on a lecture tour abroad. He renounced his citizenship and eventually settled in the United States.

“What is special in this letter that Einstein really forecast – he’s seeing in advance, 10 years in advance – what is going to be in Germany,” said Meron Eren, co-founder of the Kedem Auction House in Jerusalem, which sold the artefact to an unidentified bidder.




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