Russia, Turkey will continue efforts to establish peace in Syria: Putin


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08 Apr, 2019 11:50 pm

MOSCOW (Reuters) – Russia and Turkey will continue their efforts to establish peace in Syria, Russian President Vladimir Putin said after talks with Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan in Moscow on Monday.

Putin also said he and Erdogan discussed the supply of S-400 missile systems to Turkey.

Russia, Turkey, Iran discuss Syria ceasefire implementation in Astana

Earlier, experts from Russia, Turkey, Iran and the United Nations have started a technical meeting in Kazakhstan’s capital, Astana, to discuss in detail the implementation of the Syrian ceasefire agreement, Kazakhstan’s Foreign Ministry said on Monday.

“Representatives of Jordan are expected to take part for the first time,” a ministry spokesman said of the talks.

He said the agenda included reviewing the implementation of the cessation of hostilities, discussing a proposal from the Syrian armed opposition about the ceasefire, and determining options about how to implement it.

“This is about creating a mechanism to control the implementation of the ceasefire,” the ministry spokesman said.
The ministry gave no information about the line-up of the delegations, who were meeting behind closed doors.

Russia, Turkey, Iran deliberate over Syria ceasefire efforts

Russia, Turkey and Iran were working on a statement to reaffirm a fragile ceasefire between Syrian warring parties that could agree to establishing a mechanism to observe its compliance and pave the way for a UN-led peace settlement.

Delegations from the Syrian government and opposition were holding indirect talks for a second day in the Kazakh capital at a time when Turkey, which backs the rebels, and Russia, which supports Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, each want to disentangle themselves from the fighting.

That has led them into an ad-hoc alliance that some believe represents the best chance for progress towards a peace deal, especially with the United States distracted by domestic issues.

However, after two days of deliberations an initial draft communique suggests the powers have agreed little beyond reaffirming the need for a political resolution and to reaffirm a Dec. 30 ceasefire that each side accuses the other of violating.

Delegates from all three sides were wrangling over the terms of the final communique.

“If the guarantors want the success of this meeting they have to do something more on the ground,” senior opposition negotiator Osama Abu Zaid told reporters. “There are pledges from the Russian side to reinforce the ceasefire in areas where there are continued violations, but we’re waiting for more than just statements.”

A rebel source said they were now discussing a draft of the final text with their Turkish backers.

A Syrian government source said consultations were ongoing to break obstacles made by Turkey, which he said was trying to introduce elements beyond the Astana framework.

The draft statement from Monday includes a paragraph suggesting the powers would either consider or establish “a trilateral mechanism to observe and ensure full compliance with the ceasefire, prevent any provocation and determine all modalities.”




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